FAQs

Please find below frequently asked questions about PKAVS. You can also click on the magnifying glass to the left of the page to type in your question. If you can’t find the answer you’re looking for, please don’t hesitate to get in touch by emailing admin@pkavs.org.uk or by calling us on 01738 567076.

We will try our best to add answers to any questions not answered, we want the website to be as helpful as possible.

 
 
Q

What is PKAVS?

We are a local charity supporting people throughout Perthshire. Our vision is a Perth & Kinross where people flourish and their communities thrive.

We offer support to unpaid carers, minority communities, individuals experiencing issues with mental ill-health, the local Third Sector, volunteers, older people, and those with mobility issues.

Q

Are PKAVS part of Perth & Kinross Council?

We are not part of Perth & Kinross council but our work supports the services that they offer. We work closely with PKC, NHS Tayside, and Perth & Kinross Health and Social Care partnership, as well as alongside many local charities, community groups, and others.

Q

Where is PKAVS based?

Our main offices are based at The Gateway on North Methven Street in Perth City Centre. Our Minority Communities Hub and Third Sector Interface work from here. Our services for unpaid carers is based at Perth & Kinross Carers Centre in North Methven Perth. Our Mental Health & Wellbeing services are based at The Walled Garden on the grounds of Murray Royal Hospital and Wisecraft in Blairgowrie. We also run Shopmobility in Perth City Centre. Additionally, we operate many satellite and outreach services throughout Perthshire.

Q

How long has PKAVS been operating?

Established in 1972, PKAVS has been supporting local people and their communities for 50 years.

Q

How do I contact PKAVS?

You can get in touch with us by calling 01738 567 076 or by emailing admin@pkavs.org.uk. Alternatively, you can get in touch with one of our services through the information on our contact page.

Q

Can I volunteer from home?

Yes. It’s an increasingly popular way of volunteering. In particular during the coronavirus outbreak, measures have been brought in that mean we all have had to spend more time at home.

Example opportunities are telephone befriending or some people combine their hobby with volunteering such as knitters making blankets and baby clothes to be sold for charity. There are also many remote opportunities for young people to support their communities.

Q

Am I an unpaid carer?

The term carer can cause confusion as it can often be associated with paid employment as a carer or claiming carers allowance. Yet, carers who are able to claim carers allowance make up a small proportion of the population of those providing support to someone. Current statistics show that 1 in 10 people are carers at the moment with it being predicted that with the aging population, every 3 in 5 people will have a caring role at some point in their life.

Under the Carers (Scotland) Act 2016:

‘A carer is someone who provides or intends to provide care for another person because of a long term condition or disability’

You can be caring for someone for ANY amount of hoursYou do NOT need to be living in the same house as the person you are caring forThe person you are caring for does NOT need to be in receipt of a social care packageYou as the carer, do NOT need to be in receipt of carers allowance

Q

What support is available where I live?

To find out what support is available where you live, the following website may help: http://www.yourcommunitypk.org

Alternatively please call PKAVS carers hub on 01738 567076 (Option 2) and our staff here will be able to help.

Q

Where can I find accessible resources about COVID-19 guidance?

The following link may be a useful starting point: www.nhsinform.scot/illnesses-and-conditions/infections-and-poisoning/coronavirus-covid-19

Q

What is an Adult Carer Support Plan?

An Adult Carer Support Plan (ACSP) starts with a conversation where you discuss your caring role and what is important to you in your life. It helps plan what could help you work towards your goals.

Why is an adult carer support plan important? An adult carer support plan helps you to think about what support you might need if you wish to continue caring and what could help you to have a life alongside caring. The plan sets out any needs you have and how they will be met. Making a plan also helps to decide which level you reach in the local eligibility criteria for support. This will be used to decide what support you have a right to. No matter what level you are, every carer can access information and support from community organisations like your local Carer Centre and you may also be able to access other forms of support too.

How do you make an adult carer support plan? Before you have a conversation with your worker it can help to think of a typical day helping the person you care for and make a note of your needs and concerns. If the caring situation changes a lot over time, think about what a good and bad day look like. Also think about the things that could help you cope with caring.

The key points of the conversation are written down with agreed actions and this becomes the adult carer support plan. You will have a copy to keep. If you wish, a copy can also be given to any other person you choose.

Q

What is a Young Carer Statement?

The young carer statement will contain a variety of information about your own circumstances and caring role. It must contain information about:

The nature and extent of the care provided and the impact on your wellbeing and day-to-day lifeThe extent to which you are able and willing to provide care;Whether the responsible authority thinks that it is appropriate for you, as a child or young person, to be a carer for the person you care forEmergency and future care planning, including any arrangements that are in placeWhat ‘personal outcomes’ matter to you in order continue to provide care, where that is appropriate, to have a life alongside caring, and to improve your own health and wellbeing;Support available to you if you live in a different local authority are from the person you care forWhether support should be provided as a break from caringSupport available to you locallyAny support which the responsible authority intends to provide to you andThe circumstances in which your young carer statement is to be reviewed.

When you turn 18 years of age, any young carer statement you have will continue until you are provided with an adult carer support plan. If you do not wish to continue providing care, you can choose not to have an adult carers support plan.

Q

I’ve heard that my Local Authority/Trust can support me as a carer – is that true?

Yes. With the implementation of the Carers (Scotland) Act on the 1 st of April 2018 all local authorities now have a Duty to support unpaid carers in their caring role. Key duties placed upon local authorities to support carers include:

A right to be involved in care planning and assessment processes for the person you care forA right to be involved in hospital discharge planning processesA right to access information and adviceA right to access an adult carer support plan (carers over the age of 18)A right to be involved in the planning and development of any carer servicesA right to access a young carers statement (carers under the age of 18)A right to access support if your needs meet the local eligibility criteria for carers

The key messages for carers of all ages that are outlined in the Act are:

Carers are better supported on a more consistent basis so that they can continue to care, if they so wishCarers should be better supported to have good health and well-being allowing them to have a life outside caringIt is recommended to avoid making any assumptions about a carer’s willingness or ability to careYoung carers should be relieved of any inappropriate caring roles to allow them to have a quality of life

Q

What Carer's Assessments are available?

Young carers assessments are available for children aged between 5 and 18 years old. Adult carer support plans are available to all carers aged 18 years plus. To find out more please contact PKAVS Carers Support on 01738 567076.

Q

Who can have a Carer’s Assessment?

The Carers (Scotland) Act 2016 says that anyone who provides or intends to provide a substantial amount of care on a regular basis can have a carer’s assessment. No definition of ‘substantial’ or ‘regular’ is given, so if you feel you devote a lot of time to caring for someone and you do this regularly, you can have a carer’s assessment. Even if you do not provide a lot of hours of care, you can still have an assessment if your caring role has a big impact on your life. The assessment is not linked to Carer’s Allowance. It is up to you when you ask for a carer’s assessment.

You can ask for the assessment before you take up caring or at any point when you are already caring for someone. If you share caring responsibilities with another person, or more than one person, you can each have a carer’s assessment so long as you are each providing a substantial amount of care on a regular basis. You can have a carer’s assessment to look at the help that you need even if the disabled person does not want to have a community care assessment to look at the help that they need. If the social work department refuses to carry out a carer’s assessment for you and you are providing regular and substantial care for someone you can make a complaint. You can have a carer’s assessment if you:

Live with the person you are looking after.Live away from the person you are looking after.Care for someone full time.Care for someone as well as working full or part time. Young carers can also have a carer’s assessment. This is especially important to remember if the young carer is not being supported under the Children (Scotland) Act 1995 or they are between 16 and 18 years old.

You don’t necessarily have to live with the person you are looking after or be caring full time to have a carer’s assessment. You may be juggling work and care and this is having a big impact on your life. It is up to you when you ask for a carer’s assessment. You can ask for the assessment before you take up caring or at any point when you are already caring for someone.

Q

Who will carry out my Carer’s Assessment/Support Plan?

The Carer’s Assessment or Support Plan will be done by a social worker or another professional and will depend on whether the referral is received at PKAVS or at the social work teams at the local authority (in some areas, the social work department asks local voluntary organisations such as PKAVS or health professionals to carry out the support plan). The assessment will normally be carried out at a face to face meeting.

Depending on the outcomes identified through completing the support plan often there can be other agencies become involved to ensure an appropriate support package is put in place to address the carers specific needs. This may involve a member of PKAVS staff completing the initial support plan but then referring that onto social work and vice versa.

Q

Where will my Carer's Assessment take place?

The assessment should be carried out in a convenient and private place. For example, this could be at a social work office or at your home. Assessments can be done over the phone if this is the best way for you, for example if it fits in with your routine or offers more privacy. The social worker carrying out the assessment should discuss this with you beforehand.

Q

Who will be at my Carer's Assessment?

The carer’s assessment can be carried out with or without the person you are looking after being present. It is up to you. You can also have a family member, a friend or a professional person such as a Carers Support Worker from a carers’ centre with you if you wish. Having someone with you should be discussed when the assessment meeting is being arranged.

Q

How long would I have to wait to get a Carer Support Plan completed?

Perth & Kinross Carers Strategy 2019-2022 A Life Alongside Caring states that the maximum time to wait from a referral being received for an Adult Carer Support Plan to be completed will be 10 weeks and for a Young Carers Statement it would be 12 weeks. Obviously, these are maximum lengths of time you would be expected to wait but the aspiration would be that these were done sooner.

Q

What kind of questions will I be asked at my Carer's Assessment?

Your carer’s assessment should cover the following areas:

Your caring role

Your health

Your feelings

Choices about caring

Work

Study

Leisure

Housing

Even if you are not asked questions about these issues, you can raise them in the assessment meeting. By answering the following questions, you should get a much clearer idea of your needs and you can then discuss with your social worker the services that might be most helpful to you to meet these needs.

Q

What’s a short break?

A short break is a form of support which allows the carer to have time out from their caring role. This is broader than the term ‘respite’, as it covers shorter periods of time, and a much larger range of activities.

PKAVS carers hub can help support carers access person centred respite breaks. To find out more please this please contact PKAVS Respite Development officer Erman Maglalang on 01738 567076 or at erman.maglalang@pkavs.org.uk

Q

What happens with hospital discharges if I am an unpaid carer?

Hospital staff have a duty to involve carers in discharge planning.

This means that hospital staff must talk to the carer before someone is discharged.

The carer should check with the person being discharged if it is ok to talk about their care needs with hospital staff, and if there are any changes in the support they will need when they leave hospital.

PKAVS carers hub has a dedicated Hospital Link worker post who aims to help support carers before and after hospital discharge. To find out more please contact Marie Morris on 01738 567076 or at marie.morris@pkavs.org.uk

Q

Should I tell my employer I’m an unpaid carer?

As an employee you do not need to make your employer aware that you are a carer, however, they may be able to support you in ways you hadn’t considered, or even just have regular support sessions to see how you are. Knowing that your employer is happy to listen and provide support if you need it, particularly if circumstances change for you due to your caring role, can have a hugely positive impact.

Q

How do I find out about courses and training that may help me in my caring role?

PKAVS carers hub develop and deliver a number of courses and learning opportunities throughout the year to help support carers. To find out more on what opportunities there are please visit our Training and Events section or contact Marlena Nowacyzk on 01738 567076 or at Marlena.nowacyzk@pkavs.org.uk

Q

How do I make an appointment with a Carers Support Worker?

You can either call PKAVS carers hub on 01738 567076, leave a message on this website or send an email to carershubadmin@pkavs.org.uk. Alternatively you can complete and submit a referral form and a support worker will get in touch with you to discuss this further.

Q

Can I be added to your mailing list for carers info?

Yes. To do so either call PKAVS carers hub on 01738 567076, leave a message on this website or send an email to carershubadmin@pkavs.org.uk

Q

I have made a referral to PKAVS Carers Centre and haven’t heard anything back, who do I contact?

Depending on the age of the carer it would be best if you called PKAVS on 01738 567076 and ask to speak to the young carers coordinator (if carer aged between 5 and 15 years old), young adult carers coordinator (if the carer is aged between 16 and 24 years old) and the adult carers coordinator if the carer is aged 25 years old or above. Alternatively you can chase this up through leaving a message on this website or by emailing carershubadmin@pkavs.org.uk.

Q

Will my Carer's Assessment include planning for emergencies?

During your Carer’s Assessment, there should also be a discussion about planning for emergencies, eg to make sure the person you care for would be looked after if you were taken ill and had to go into hospital. Some local councils have a Carer Emergency Scheme and through this you can contact a scheme operator who will have access to your emergency plan and will put it into action. The local council should be able to tell you more about what they can do to help you plan for an emergency.

You should also have the opportunity to have a discussion about planning for the future. This could include looking at future plans for your adult child or partner should you be unable to care in the future because of age or ill health or to plan for your child leaving school. The local council should help you prepare a plan, sometimes called an ‘anticipatory plan’ to prepare for the future.

Q

What is Self Directed Support (SDS)?

The Social Care (Self Directed Support) Act came into force on 1 April 2014 and gives local councils a power to offer carers services. Carers may be offered any of the self-directed support options after a Carer’s Assessment. Examples of how this could be used include:

Driving lessonsHelp with housework and gardeningA short break, with or without the person you care forAn opportunity to take part in activity to improve your health and wellbeing, for example, art classes, yoga etcEmotional support or counsellingTraining to help you in your caring role

You are the best person to decide what help you need. You need to identify what support would make a difference to you personally. You should not be expected to choose from a ‘shopping list’ of options if these options will not help you in your caring role. If your council offers you support as a carer you cannot be charged for this. To find out more about self-directed support contact Billy Morrison at PKAVS carers hub on 01738 567076 or billy.morrison@pkavs.org.uk

Q

Am I an unpaid carer?

The term carer can cause confusion as it can often be associated with paid employment as a carer or claiming carers allowance. Yet, carers who are able to claim carers allowance make up a small proportion of the population of those providing support to someone. Current statistics show that 1 in 10 people are carers at the moment with it being predicted that with the aging population, every 3 in 5 people will have a caring role at some point in their life.

Under the Carers (Scotland) Act 2016:

‘A carer is someone who provides or intends to provide care for another person because of a long term condition or disability’

You can be caring for someone for ANY amount of hoursYou do NOT need to be living in the same house as the person you are caring forThe person you are caring for does NOT need to be in receipt of a social care packageYou as the carer, do NOT need to be in receipt of carers allowance

Q

What support is available where I live?

To find out what support is available where you live, the following website may help: http://www.yourcommunitypk.org

Alternatively please call PKAVS carers hub on 01738 567076 (Option 2) and our staff here will be able to help.

Q

Where can I find accessible resources about COVID-19 guidance?

The following link may be a useful starting point: www.nhsinform.scot/illnesses-and-conditions/infections-and-poisoning/coronavirus-covid-19

Q

What is an Adult Carer Support Plan?

An Adult Carer Support Plan (ACSP) starts with a conversation where you discuss your caring role and what is important to you in your life. It helps plan what could help you work towards your goals.

Why is an adult carer support plan important? An adult carer support plan helps you to think about what support you might need if you wish to continue caring and what could help you to have a life alongside caring. The plan sets out any needs you have and how they will be met. Making a plan also helps to decide which level you reach in the local eligibility criteria for support. This will be used to decide what support you have a right to. No matter what level you are, every carer can access information and support from community organisations like your local Carer Centre and you may also be able to access other forms of support too.

How do you make an adult carer support plan? Before you have a conversation with your worker it can help to think of a typical day helping the person you care for and make a note of your needs and concerns. If the caring situation changes a lot over time, think about what a good and bad day look like. Also think about the things that could help you cope with caring.

The key points of the conversation are written down with agreed actions and this becomes the adult carer support plan. You will have a copy to keep. If you wish, a copy can also be given to any other person you choose.

Q

What Carer's Assessments are available?

Young carers assessments are available for children aged between 5 and 18 years old. Adult carer support plans are available to all carers aged 18 years plus. To find out more please contact PKAVS Carers Support on 01738 567076.

Q

Who can have a Carer’s Assessment?

The Carers (Scotland) Act 2016 says that anyone who provides or intends to provide a substantial amount of care on a regular basis can have a carer’s assessment. No definition of ‘substantial’ or ‘regular’ is given, so if you feel you devote a lot of time to caring for someone and you do this regularly, you can have a carer’s assessment. Even if you do not provide a lot of hours of care, you can still have an assessment if your caring role has a big impact on your life. The assessment is not linked to Carer’s Allowance. It is up to you when you ask for a carer’s assessment.

You can ask for the assessment before you take up caring or at any point when you are already caring for someone. If you share caring responsibilities with another person, or more than one person, you can each have a carer’s assessment so long as you are each providing a substantial amount of care on a regular basis. You can have a carer’s assessment to look at the help that you need even if the disabled person does not want to have a community care assessment to look at the help that they need. If the social work department refuses to carry out a carer’s assessment for you and you are providing regular and substantial care for someone you can make a complaint. You can have a carer’s assessment if you:

Live with the person you are looking after.Live away from the person you are looking after.Care for someone full time.Care for someone as well as working full or part time. Young carers can also have a carer’s assessment. This is especially important to remember if the young carer is not being supported under the Children (Scotland) Act 1995 or they are between 16 and 18 years old.

You don’t necessarily have to live with the person you are looking after or be caring full time to have a carer’s assessment. You may be juggling work and care and this is having a big impact on your life. It is up to you when you ask for a carer’s assessment. You can ask for the assessment before you take up caring or at any point when you are already caring for someone.

Q

Who will carry out my Carer’s Assessment/Support Plan?

The Carer’s Assessment or Support Plan will be done by a social worker or another professional and will depend on whether the referral is received at PKAVS or at the social work teams at the local authority (in some areas, the social work department asks local voluntary organisations such as PKAVS or health professionals to carry out the support plan). The assessment will normally be carried out at a face to face meeting.

Depending on the outcomes identified through completing the support plan often there can be other agencies become involved to ensure an appropriate support package is put in place to address the carers specific needs. This may involve a member of PKAVS staff completing the initial support plan but then referring that onto social work and vice versa.

Q

Where will my Carer's Assessment take place?

The assessment should be carried out in a convenient and private place. For example, this could be at a social work office or at your home. Assessments can be done over the phone if this is the best way for you, for example if it fits in with your routine or offers more privacy. The social worker carrying out the assessment should discuss this with you beforehand.

Q

Who will be at my Carer's Assessment?

The carer’s assessment can be carried out with or without the person you are looking after being present. It is up to you. You can also have a family member, a friend or a professional person such as a Carers Support Worker from a carers’ centre with you if you wish. Having someone with you should be discussed when the assessment meeting is being arranged.

Q

How long would I have to wait to get a Carer Support Plan completed?

Perth & Kinross Carers Strategy 2019-2022 A Life Alongside Caring states that the maximum time to wait from a referral being received for an Adult Carer Support Plan to be completed will be 10 weeks and for a Young Carers Statement it would be 12 weeks. Obviously, these are maximum lengths of time you would be expected to wait but the aspiration would be that these were done sooner.

Q

What kind of questions will I be asked at my Carer's Assessment?

Your carer’s assessment should cover the following areas:

Your caring role

Your health

Your feelings

Choices about caring

Work

Study

Leisure

Housing

Even if you are not asked questions about these issues, you can raise them in the assessment meeting. By answering the following questions, you should get a much clearer idea of your needs and you can then discuss with your social worker the services that might be most helpful to you to meet these needs.

Q

What’s a short break?

A short break is a form of support which allows the carer to have time out from their caring role. This is broader than the term ‘respite’, as it covers shorter periods of time, and a much larger range of activities.

PKAVS carers hub can help support carers access person centred respite breaks. To find out more please this please contact PKAVS Respite Development officer Erman Maglalang on 01738 567076 or at erman.maglalang@pkavs.org.uk

Q

What happens with hospital discharges if I am an unpaid carer?

Hospital staff have a duty to involve carers in discharge planning.

This means that hospital staff must talk to the carer before someone is discharged.

The carer should check with the person being discharged if it is ok to talk about their care needs with hospital staff, and if there are any changes in the support they will need when they leave hospital.

PKAVS carers hub has a dedicated Hospital Link worker post who aims to help support carers before and after hospital discharge. To find out more please contact Marie Morris on 01738 567076 or at marie.morris@pkavs.org.uk

Q

Should I tell my employer I’m an unpaid carer?

As an employee you do not need to make your employer aware that you are a carer, however, they may be able to support you in ways you hadn’t considered, or even just have regular support sessions to see how you are. Knowing that your employer is happy to listen and provide support if you need it, particularly if circumstances change for you due to your caring role, can have a hugely positive impact.

Q

How do I find out about courses and training that may help me in my caring role?

PKAVS carers hub develop and deliver a number of courses and learning opportunities throughout the year to help support carers. To find out more on what opportunities there are please visit our Training and Events section or contact Marlena Nowacyzk on 01738 567076 or at Marlena.nowacyzk@pkavs.org.uk

Q

How do I make an appointment with a Carers Support Worker?

You can either call PKAVS carers hub on 01738 567076, leave a message on this website or send an email to carershubadmin@pkavs.org.uk. Alternatively you can complete and submit a referral form and a support worker will get in touch with you to discuss this further.

Q

I have made a referral to PKAVS Carers Centre and haven’t heard anything back, who do I contact?

Depending on the age of the carer it would be best if you called PKAVS on 01738 567076 and ask to speak to the young carers coordinator (if carer aged between 5 and 15 years old), young adult carers coordinator (if the carer is aged between 16 and 24 years old) and the adult carers coordinator if the carer is aged 25 years old or above. Alternatively you can chase this up through leaving a message on this website or by emailing carershubadmin@pkavs.org.uk.

Q

Will my Carer's Assessment include planning for emergencies?

During your Carer’s Assessment, there should also be a discussion about planning for emergencies, eg to make sure the person you care for would be looked after if you were taken ill and had to go into hospital. Some local councils have a Carer Emergency Scheme and through this you can contact a scheme operator who will have access to your emergency plan and will put it into action. The local council should be able to tell you more about what they can do to help you plan for an emergency.

You should also have the opportunity to have a discussion about planning for the future. This could include looking at future plans for your adult child or partner should you be unable to care in the future because of age or ill health or to plan for your child leaving school. The local council should help you prepare a plan, sometimes called an ‘anticipatory plan’ to prepare for the future.

Q

What is Self Directed Support (SDS)?

The Social Care (Self Directed Support) Act came into force on 1 April 2014 and gives local councils a power to offer carers services. Carers may be offered any of the self-directed support options after a Carer’s Assessment. Examples of how this could be used include:

Driving lessonsHelp with housework and gardeningA short break, with or without the person you care forAn opportunity to take part in activity to improve your health and wellbeing, for example, art classes, yoga etcEmotional support or counsellingTraining to help you in your caring role

You are the best person to decide what help you need. You need to identify what support would make a difference to you personally. You should not be expected to choose from a ‘shopping list’ of options if these options will not help you in your caring role. If your council offers you support as a carer you cannot be charged for this. To find out more about self-directed support contact Billy Morrison at PKAVS carers hub on 01738 567076 or billy.morrison@pkavs.org.uk

Q

What is a Young Carer Statement?

The young carer statement will contain a variety of information about your own circumstances and caring role. It must contain information about:

The nature and extent of the care provided and the impact on your wellbeing and day-to-day lifeThe extent to which you are able and willing to provide care;Whether the responsible authority thinks that it is appropriate for you, as a child or young person, to be a carer for the person you care forEmergency and future care planning, including any arrangements that are in placeWhat ‘personal outcomes’ matter to you in order continue to provide care, where that is appropriate, to have a life alongside caring, and to improve your own health and wellbeing;Support available to you if you live in a different local authority are from the person you care forWhether support should be provided as a break from caringSupport available to you locallyAny support which the responsible authority intends to provide to you andThe circumstances in which your young carer statement is to be reviewed.

When you turn 18 years of age, any young carer statement you have will continue until you are provided with an adult carer support plan. If you do not wish to continue providing care, you can choose not to have an adult carers support plan.

Q

What Carer's Assessments are available?

Young carers assessments are available for children aged between 5 and 18 years old. Adult carer support plans are available to all carers aged 18 years plus. To find out more please contact PKAVS Carers Support on 01738 567076.

Q

Who can have a Carer’s Assessment?

The Carers (Scotland) Act 2016 says that anyone who provides or intends to provide a substantial amount of care on a regular basis can have a carer’s assessment. No definition of ‘substantial’ or ‘regular’ is given, so if you feel you devote a lot of time to caring for someone and you do this regularly, you can have a carer’s assessment. Even if you do not provide a lot of hours of care, you can still have an assessment if your caring role has a big impact on your life. The assessment is not linked to Carer’s Allowance. It is up to you when you ask for a carer’s assessment.

You can ask for the assessment before you take up caring or at any point when you are already caring for someone. If you share caring responsibilities with another person, or more than one person, you can each have a carer’s assessment so long as you are each providing a substantial amount of care on a regular basis. You can have a carer’s assessment to look at the help that you need even if the disabled person does not want to have a community care assessment to look at the help that they need. If the social work department refuses to carry out a carer’s assessment for you and you are providing regular and substantial care for someone you can make a complaint. You can have a carer’s assessment if you:

Live with the person you are looking after.Live away from the person you are looking after.Care for someone full time.Care for someone as well as working full or part time. Young carers can also have a carer’s assessment. This is especially important to remember if the young carer is not being supported under the Children (Scotland) Act 1995 or they are between 16 and 18 years old.

You don’t necessarily have to live with the person you are looking after or be caring full time to have a carer’s assessment. You may be juggling work and care and this is having a big impact on your life. It is up to you when you ask for a carer’s assessment. You can ask for the assessment before you take up caring or at any point when you are already caring for someone.

Q

Who will carry out my Carer’s Assessment/Support Plan?

The Carer’s Assessment or Support Plan will be done by a social worker or another professional and will depend on whether the referral is received at PKAVS or at the social work teams at the local authority (in some areas, the social work department asks local voluntary organisations such as PKAVS or health professionals to carry out the support plan). The assessment will normally be carried out at a face to face meeting.

Depending on the outcomes identified through completing the support plan often there can be other agencies become involved to ensure an appropriate support package is put in place to address the carers specific needs. This may involve a member of PKAVS staff completing the initial support plan but then referring that onto social work and vice versa.

Q

Where will my Carer's Assessment take place?

The assessment should be carried out in a convenient and private place. For example, this could be at a social work office or at your home. Assessments can be done over the phone if this is the best way for you, for example if it fits in with your routine or offers more privacy. The social worker carrying out the assessment should discuss this with you beforehand.

Q

Who will be at my Carer's Assessment?

The carer’s assessment can be carried out with or without the person you are looking after being present. It is up to you. You can also have a family member, a friend or a professional person such as a Carers Support Worker from a carers’ centre with you if you wish. Having someone with you should be discussed when the assessment meeting is being arranged.

Q

How long would I have to wait to get a Carer Support Plan completed?

Perth & Kinross Carers Strategy 2019-2022 A Life Alongside Caring states that the maximum time to wait from a referral being received for an Adult Carer Support Plan to be completed will be 10 weeks and for a Young Carers Statement it would be 12 weeks. Obviously, these are maximum lengths of time you would be expected to wait but the aspiration would be that these were done sooner.

Q

What kind of questions will I be asked at my Carer's Assessment?

Your carer’s assessment should cover the following areas:

Your caring role

Your health

Your feelings

Choices about caring

Work

Study

Leisure

Housing

Even if you are not asked questions about these issues, you can raise them in the assessment meeting. By answering the following questions, you should get a much clearer idea of your needs and you can then discuss with your social worker the services that might be most helpful to you to meet these needs.

Q

How do I make an appointment with a Carers Support Worker?

You can either call PKAVS carers hub on 01738 567076, leave a message on this website or send an email to carershubadmin@pkavs.org.uk. Alternatively you can complete and submit a referral form and a support worker will get in touch with you to discuss this further.

Q

I have made a referral to PKAVS Carers Centre and haven’t heard anything back, who do I contact?

Depending on the age of the carer it would be best if you called PKAVS on 01738 567076 and ask to speak to the young carers coordinator (if carer aged between 5 and 15 years old), young adult carers coordinator (if the carer is aged between 16 and 24 years old) and the adult carers coordinator if the carer is aged 25 years old or above. Alternatively you can chase this up through leaving a message on this website or by emailing carershubadmin@pkavs.org.uk.

Q

Will my Carer's Assessment include planning for emergencies?

During your Carer’s Assessment, there should also be a discussion about planning for emergencies, eg to make sure the person you care for would be looked after if you were taken ill and had to go into hospital. Some local councils have a Carer Emergency Scheme and through this you can contact a scheme operator who will have access to your emergency plan and will put it into action. The local council should be able to tell you more about what they can do to help you plan for an emergency.

You should also have the opportunity to have a discussion about planning for the future. This could include looking at future plans for your adult child or partner should you be unable to care in the future because of age or ill health or to plan for your child leaving school. The local council should help you prepare a plan, sometimes called an ‘anticipatory plan’ to prepare for the future.

Q

What Carer's Assessments are available?

Young carers assessments are available for children aged between 5 and 18 years old. Adult carer support plans are available to all carers aged 18 years plus. To find out more please contact PKAVS Carers Support on 01738 567076.

Q

Who can have a Carer’s Assessment?

The Carers (Scotland) Act 2016 says that anyone who provides or intends to provide a substantial amount of care on a regular basis can have a carer’s assessment. No definition of ‘substantial’ or ‘regular’ is given, so if you feel you devote a lot of time to caring for someone and you do this regularly, you can have a carer’s assessment. Even if you do not provide a lot of hours of care, you can still have an assessment if your caring role has a big impact on your life. The assessment is not linked to Carer’s Allowance. It is up to you when you ask for a carer’s assessment.

You can ask for the assessment before you take up caring or at any point when you are already caring for someone. If you share caring responsibilities with another person, or more than one person, you can each have a carer’s assessment so long as you are each providing a substantial amount of care on a regular basis. You can have a carer’s assessment to look at the help that you need even if the disabled person does not want to have a community care assessment to look at the help that they need. If the social work department refuses to carry out a carer’s assessment for you and you are providing regular and substantial care for someone you can make a complaint. You can have a carer’s assessment if you:

Live with the person you are looking after.Live away from the person you are looking after.Care for someone full time.Care for someone as well as working full or part time. Young carers can also have a carer’s assessment. This is especially important to remember if the young carer is not being supported under the Children (Scotland) Act 1995 or they are between 16 and 18 years old.

You don’t necessarily have to live with the person you are looking after or be caring full time to have a carer’s assessment. You may be juggling work and care and this is having a big impact on your life. It is up to you when you ask for a carer’s assessment. You can ask for the assessment before you take up caring or at any point when you are already caring for someone.

Q

Where will my Carer's Assessment take place?

The assessment should be carried out in a convenient and private place. For example, this could be at a social work office or at your home. Assessments can be done over the phone if this is the best way for you, for example if it fits in with your routine or offers more privacy. The social worker carrying out the assessment should discuss this with you beforehand.

Q

Who will be at my Carer's Assessment?

The carer’s assessment can be carried out with or without the person you are looking after being present. It is up to you. You can also have a family member, a friend or a professional person such as a Carers Support Worker from a carers’ centre with you if you wish. Having someone with you should be discussed when the assessment meeting is being arranged.

Q

How long would I have to wait to get a Carer Support Plan completed?

Perth & Kinross Carers Strategy 2019-2022 A Life Alongside Caring states that the maximum time to wait from a referral being received for an Adult Carer Support Plan to be completed will be 10 weeks and for a Young Carers Statement it would be 12 weeks. Obviously, these are maximum lengths of time you would be expected to wait but the aspiration would be that these were done sooner.

Q

What kind of questions will I be asked at my Carer's Assessment?

Your carer’s assessment should cover the following areas:

Your caring role

Your health

Your feelings

Choices about caring

Work

Study

Leisure

Housing

Even if you are not asked questions about these issues, you can raise them in the assessment meeting. By answering the following questions, you should get a much clearer idea of your needs and you can then discuss with your social worker the services that might be most helpful to you to meet these needs.

Q

Should I tell my employer I’m an unpaid carer?

As an employee you do not need to make your employer aware that you are a carer, however, they may be able to support you in ways you hadn’t considered, or even just have regular support sessions to see how you are. Knowing that your employer is happy to listen and provide support if you need it, particularly if circumstances change for you due to your caring role, can have a hugely positive impact.

Q

How do I make an appointment with a Carers Support Worker?

You can either call PKAVS carers hub on 01738 567076, leave a message on this website or send an email to carershubadmin@pkavs.org.uk. Alternatively you can complete and submit a referral form and a support worker will get in touch with you to discuss this further.

Q

I have made a referral to PKAVS Carers Centre and haven’t heard anything back, who do I contact?

Depending on the age of the carer it would be best if you called PKAVS on 01738 567076 and ask to speak to the young carers coordinator (if carer aged between 5 and 15 years old), young adult carers coordinator (if the carer is aged between 16 and 24 years old) and the adult carers coordinator if the carer is aged 25 years old or above. Alternatively you can chase this up through leaving a message on this website or by emailing carershubadmin@pkavs.org.uk.

Q

Will my Carer's Assessment include planning for emergencies?

During your Carer’s Assessment, there should also be a discussion about planning for emergencies, eg to make sure the person you care for would be looked after if you were taken ill and had to go into hospital. Some local councils have a Carer Emergency Scheme and through this you can contact a scheme operator who will have access to your emergency plan and will put it into action. The local council should be able to tell you more about what they can do to help you plan for an emergency.

You should also have the opportunity to have a discussion about planning for the future. This could include looking at future plans for your adult child or partner should you be unable to care in the future because of age or ill health or to plan for your child leaving school. The local council should help you prepare a plan, sometimes called an ‘anticipatory plan’ to prepare for the future.

Q

Can I still take part in exercise if I have an underlying health condition?

You should always disclose any underlying health conditions to us so our Engagement Worker can advise what you can and can’t do. Some of our activities can be adapted to suit individual physical needs.

Q

How do I stop smoking?

Clients who experience mental health issues should always speak to their GP/CPN before attempting to stop smoking. Certain medications are reduced in effectiveness by smoking, therefore clients must be monitored during the cessation process to make sure medication levels are maintained at correct levels.

Q

What do you make in the Joinery Department?

We make a wide range of items, such as bird feeders, garden furniture, and planters. Most items are made to order from members of the public, and clients are sometimes able to work on their own projects.

Q

How long does it take to make joinery products?

You will be able to work at your own pace on a project chosen by or assigned to you. Our Engagement Worker will guide you through the process step by step, helping to build your skills, knowledge, and confidence. Customers are advised that items they order may take slightly longer to make, so taking pressure off rushing what needs to be constructed.

Q

Is The Walled Garden open all year?

Yes the garden is open to the public and clients all year round,  we have an annual two week holiday over Christmas. There is always something to be keeping us busy in the garden.

Q

What do you make within the Joinery workshop?

We make a wide range of items, such as bird feeders, garden furniture and planters. We can also take orders for specific bespoke projects commissioned by you. We also upcycle old furniture. Click here for a price list and details of how to order.

Q

How long does it take for joinery orders to be fulfilled?

As items within the joinery are made by clients within the activity area the length of time to fulfil orders can vary. We ask when you place an order with us to share any specific requirements/timeframes and we will endeavour to fulfil these to the best of our ability.

Q

What is the difference between clients and volunteers?

A client is someone who attends our service to get support and uses the activities in their journey of recovery, a volunteer helps support clients by working with the engagement workers.

Q

Is it a drop-in service?

No, our activities are structured and are only accessible to clients who have completed the referral process. Workshops are on every week and we expect you to commit to your session.  This is to ensure you benefit from all the carefully planned support offered and promote a healthy routine. 

We believe in teaming up with other agencies, who can contribute to the positive wellbeing by providing drop-in support within our hubs, which is accessible to all of our clients.

Q

Do I need experience in the activity areas?

No, you don’t need any experience at all! Anyone is welcome to join in the activity of their choice. We hope that everyone can learn and help each other with tips or ideas. We all learn as we go and gain more experience, the important thing is to enjoy what you are doing.

Q

How many days can I attend for support?

Initially, during your trial period, we recommend you attend a maximum of 2 sessions per week for 4 weeks. Once you have completed this trial then we will confirm your registration with us and discuss any additional sessions required. Support is flexible and dependent on your own needs. We however encourage all clients to attend different local services and tap into other areas of support, beyond our service.

Q

What is the eligibility criteria?

You do not require a mental health diagnosis to make a referral. You should be experiencing difficulties with your mental health and wellbeing which could be ongoing low mood, feelings of isolation and/or anxiety. If you are unsure whether our service is best suited to your needs, we would be happy to meet with you before a referral is made.

Q

Do we have breaks?

Yes, we do.  We would advise bringing a bottle of water. Tea and coffee facilities are available. The café is also open to purchase food and drinks at a subsidised rate.

Clients are asked to provide a monthly contribution of £2 to help cover the costs of tea, coffee, some workshop materials, toiletries, and cleaning materials.

Q

What if I don’t feel like doing anything that day?

All we ask is you try your best. There are areas you can go to if you want to be present, but maybe don’t feel up to the activity. We do monitor this, as we want to help you feel the best you can and make sure we are the right service for you. We try our best to avoid waiting lists as we understand people can require immediate support. This means you will likely be able to access our workshops quickly but we expect a commitment in attendance to avoid someone else missing out.

Q

What sessions are available?

Each activity area has slightly different sessions times. These are:

Garden: Mon – Friday 9.30 – 12.30 (AM) 12.30-3.30 (PM)

Café: Mon – Friday 9.30-12.30 (AM) 12.30 – 3.30 (PM)

Creative Wellbeing: Mon-Thursday 10-12 (AM) 13.00-15.00 (PM)

Joinery: 9.30 – 12.15 (AM) 1-3.30 (PM)

Healthy Lifestyles: Walled Garden Friday Walk: 10.30 (AM)

Wisecraft: Monday – Yoga (AM)

Wed – Walk (PM)

Q

What do I need to bring to the art studio?

We ask that everyone brings themselves with an open mind and eager attitude. You don’t need to bring anything as we supply materials, however, you may want to bring in your own project for our free week we have every 5 weeks. (See creative wellbeing rota in resources)

Q

Do I get to take my artwork home?

Most artwork you do will be used for showcasing to share what we’ve been up to and some may be sold to help us fundraise for our charity whilst bringing you a real sense of achievement. However, if you would like to take your artwork home then please inform the Creative Wellbeing staff.

Q

Is the café open to the public?

Yes. We rely on the general public to use our café and generate a regular income. The café is a safe training place in all aspects of hospitality and catering and is great for building your confidence. We would recommend this activity to those who feel they are able to cope in what can be a busy environment at times.

Q

What tasks would I be doing in the café?

Everyone gets involved in everything that makes the café run. We all work together cooking, baking, doing dishes, cleaning, serving, and using the till. You will be able to experience all of this at your own pace.

Q

Do I need to have café work experience?

No. As with all our activities, we don’t need you to have the skills to take part. We only want you to be interested in helping in the café as full training will be given. We have our own in-house customer service award and there are opportunities to gain accredited Food Hygiene Certificates if you wish.

Q

If I want to get a job after my time in the café will you give me a reference?

We are happy to help with references to enable you to progress with your recovery.

Q

Do you cater to all allergens/dietary requirements?

Yes, please inform a member of staff on arrival.

Q

Can I reserve a table?

Yes, you can reserve a table by phoning the Walled Garden on 01738 631777. Typically, we ask for 24 hours’ notice for average bookings (no more than 12 people). We can cater for larger numbers (up to 25 people), however, we would require one weeks’ notice in advance and a deposit. This is to ensure the costs of closing the café for a day are covered.

Q

Can I pay by card?

No, we can only accept cash payments at present.

Q

Can I take food away?

Yes, we provide a takeaway food facility. If the cafe is busy please be prepared to wait for your order.

Q

Can I order food for collection?

Yes. Give us a call and the team will have it ready for you as near to your specified time as they can.

Q

Can I book the venue?

We take bookings for a variety of different events and we will tailor them as best as we can to your individual requirements. We don’t have a set price list because we are able to be so flexible.

Q

Can you cater for functions/events?

We can cater for all types of events such as weddings, christenings, birthdays, meetings, etc.

Q

What time do you start/finish serving customers?

The café is open to customers from 10 am until 3 pm. Food is served from 11 am and orders are taken until 2.20 pm.

Q

Do I have to work in a large group?

We are aware that as individuals we all have different requirements to help everyone enjoy their session, the garden has ample space that allows areas of quiet and the opportunity to work as a group too.

Q

What should I wear when doing my garden activities?

We advise everyone to be comfortable and warm, as you will easily get mucky and a bit wet at times! We have plenty of indoor spaces for you to work, but it’s best to stick with loose clothing, trainers or boots, and a warm, ideally waterproof jacket for the colder months. Gloves should be worn to protect your hands. Sun cream when the sun does appear!

Q

Is the garden open all year?

Yes, the garden is open to the public and garden clients all year round,  we have an annual two-week holiday over Christmas. There is always something to be keeping us busy in the garden.

Q

What should I wear/bring with me for Healthy Lifestyle activities?

Depending on the activity, our Engagement Worker will advise before you start what to wear/bring. For example, a healthy walk on a damp day would require you to wear waterproof shoes and clothing. A yoga/relaxation session would require you to wear loose-fitting comfortable clothes.

Q

How do I apply for housing support?

For Housing or Homeless enquiries, contact PKC Housing on 01738 476000.

Q

I need support applying for Universal Credit or benefits?

If you are looking for a Full Benefits Check, contact PKC Welfare Rights on 01738 476900To apply for UC you can call 0800 328 5644You are able to request an interpreter for these calls

Q

Can you help me save money on my Energy Bills/Broadband/Insurance costs?

If you’re struggling to pay your energy bills or are looking for financial advice to save on your fuels cost, you can contact Perth CAB on 01738 450580.

Q

I need help applying for a Crisis Grant?

Contact PKC Helpline on 0345 30 111 00 for a help applying – They can also help refer to the Foodbank if you need of a food parcel.

Q

How do I register with a GP practice?

Visit NHS Inform and search for ‘Registering with a GP’ and follow the step by step process – https://www.nhsinform.scot/

If you would like help for the MCH Team with the application forms, call 01738 567076.

Q

Where do I go to arrange childcare?

Contact PKC Support for Schools and Education Services on 01738 476200 to discuss options for funded Childcare.

Q

I need to see an optician but I have a low level of spoken English?

Cintact PKC Vision on 01738 626969 or e-mail info@visionpk.org.uk.

Q

I’m looking for support calls from a befriender, how can I arrange this?

If you are looking for a befriending call, contact MCH on 01738 567076 for more information.

Q

I’m looking for some volunteer opportunities?

Head to ‘Volunteer Scotland’ to look for opportunities near you or call PKAVS Third Sector Interface on 01738 567076.

Q

I don’t feel that my voice is being heard. Can you help?

We are always here to listen and make sure voices from Minority Communities are being heard. Please get in touch on 01738 567076 or email minoritieshub@pkavs.org.uk and we will do everything we can to help you. You are not on your own!

Q

How do I register to vote?

Visit https://www.gov.uk/register-to-vote to register to vote.

Q

I need support applying for a job?

If you are looking for Employment Support in P&K you can contact –– SDS Perth – 01738 637639– PKC Skills and Employment Initiative

Q

Can you provide support applying for a National Insurance number?

To applying for National Insurance Number call 0800 141 2075.

If you would like support with the process call the MCH Helpline on 07935756738

Q

Where can I go for support when facing redundancy?

Call SDS Pace Helpline on 0800 917 8000.

Q

Where can I access ESOL classes?

To join MCH Conversation Café – Call 07935756738 or e-mail daniel.dutton@pkavs.org.ukESOL Perth – email esolperth@gmail.com or call 07427689797PKC The Learning Curve – email learningcurve@pkc.gov.uk or call 01738 477092.Perth College UHI – Language School

Q

What is the Third Sector?

The ‘third sector’ is an umbrella term covering a range of different types of organisations that belong neither to the public sector (i.e. the state) nor to the private sector (profit-making private enterprise). The unifying factors of third sector organisations are usually not for profit and they are governed by volunteers.

Examples include:

CharitiesVoluntary and community organisationsMutual aid groupsSocial enterprises and cooperativesThink tanks and independent research institutes

Also known as:

Voluntary SectorNon-profit organisationsNGO – Non-governmental organisation: although they often work with or alongside government

Q

What is a Third Sector Interface?

Third Sector Interfaces (TSIs) are the local infrastructure support for the third sector in Scotland. Funded by the Scottish Government, Interfaces provide a single point of access for support and information for the third sector within the local area.

As the Third Sector Interface for Perth & Kinross, the TSI advocates the interests of the third sector in local statutory partnerships and joint working initiatives.

We want TSIs to be forces for change within Scotland’s communities, supporting and driving a dynamic, flourishing third sector that has a vital role to play in progressing national outcomes and realising Ministers’ ambitions for people and communities across Scotland. -(Aileen Campbell MSP, Cabinet Secretary for Communities and Local Government, Scottish Government)

Q

What is the difference between a Third Sector Organisation and a Third Sector Interface?

Most third sector interfaces are charities, which means they themselves are third sector organisations. PKAVS is the third sector interface for Perth and Kinross and is a charity that also delivers frontline services to a range of organisations, communities and individuals across Perth and Kinross.

Q

Who can PKAVS TSI help?

PKAVS Third Sector Interface can help any type of third sector organisation or group. These often include charities, social enterprises and community groups.

We also help individual people who are looking to learn more about the third sector, move forward with a project for their area of cause or who are looking to find out about volunteering.

Q

What can PKAVS TSI help with?

PKAVS TSI can provide a broad range of support and information including:

Setting up and running third sector groups/organisationsGovernanceComplianceDissolutionWorking with volunteerVolunteering

Q

What does Community Empowerment mean?

Community empowerment is the idea that we all must work together to make Scotland a better place to live and that when we have a stake in the decision making that affects us, better decisions will be made.

Scottish Government introduced legislation in 2015 called the Community Empowerment Act and this is designed to give legal backing to the voice of communities so that public services can be shaped to suit everyone better and, in particular, address the needs of the most vulnerable people in the country.

Q

What is Community Planning?

Community planning helps local public services to work together and with local communities to plan and deliver better services that make a real difference to people’s lives. It is based on the idea that public bodies can get better results locally by working together and with our communities so that public services improve for the people who use them.

The Perth and Kinross Community Planning Partnership leads the community planning process in our area and is responsible for providing strategic direction, agreeing priorities and managing performance. More information can be found in here.

Q

Who are the core partners involved in Perth & Kinross Community Planning Partnership?

Jobcentre PlusOpensNHS Tayside OpensPerth & Kinross Association of Voluntary Services (PKAVS)Perth & Kinross CouncilPerth CollegePolice ScotlandScottish EnterpriseScottish Fire & Rescue ServiceSkills Development Scotland

Q

What are the Outcome Delivery Groups?

The Outcome Delivery Groups lead and are responsible for actions which support the delivery of the Community Plan across Perth and Kinross. There are 6 Outcome Delivery Groups

Children, Young People and Families PartnershipEconomy and Lifelong Learning GroupHealth and Social Care PartnershipCommunity Safety PartnershipPerth and Kinross Community Justice PartnershipPublic Realm Outcome Delivery Group

More details can be found in here.

Q

What are TSI's roles in supporting Community Planning?

The Scottish Government suggests TSIs take a strategic role in third sector involvement in community planning and in responding to local needs and outcomes.

PKAVS TSI supports, develops, and connects voluntary organisations, charities, community groups, social enterprise and volunteering throughout Perth & Kinross.

PKAVS TSI promotes the interests of the voluntary sector in local statutory partnerships and joint working initiatives.

More information about TSIs’ role in supporting the third sector in the process of community planning can be found through the following links:

Community Empowerment (Scotland) Act 2015, part 2 Community Planning: guidance

Statutory Guidance on Part 3 (Children’s Services Planning) of the Children and Young People (Scotland) Act 2014

Q

What is volunteering?

Volunteering is used to describe the wide range of ways in which people help out, get involved, volunteer and participate in their communities (both communities of interest and communities of place). Volunteering is a choice. A choice to give time or energy, a choice undertaken of one’s own free will and a choice not motivated for financial gain or for a wage or salary.

Q

How much time do I need to volunteer?

This is really up to you. You can find volunteering opportunities that only take one hour per month, to five days a week – or more. Some organisations ask for a particular commitment from their volunteers while others are able to take a more flexible approach. The filter function on opportunities search helps narrow down the opportunities that suit your life.

Q

Can I leave my volunteering position if I don’t like it?

Yes, you can. You are under no obligation to keep volunteering for an organisation if you don’t like it. But it is always worth talking to somebody before stopping. That could be your volunteer co-ordinator (if there is one), supervisor or someone in the organisation who is responsible for you. You can discuss with them why you feel unhappy and what you feel would improve your time as a volunteer

Q

Can I get volunteering expenses paid?

Information given on the organisation’s website often gives details about expenses but if it’s not there, ask your chosen organisation before you start volunteering.

Q

Can I volunteer from home?

Yes. It’s an increasingly popular way of volunteering. In particular during the coronavirus outbreak, measures have been brought in that mean we all have had to spend more time at home.

Example opportunities are telephone befriending or some people combine their hobby with volunteering such as knitters making blankets and baby clothes to be sold for charity. There are also many remote opportunities for young people to support their communities.

Q

Where are the volunteering opportunities advertised?

Once you have registered (embed the registration form here) the opportunity with us, it then will be available for people to access through the following ways:

Volunteer ScotlandPKAVS/TSI Looking To Volunteer (we will need to ensure that we transfer the search engine on our current page into the new page)Saltire Award (age appropriate)

Q

How do volunteers apply for opportunities?

You can search volunteering opportunities on the following webpages:

Volunteer ScotlandPKAVS/TSI Looking To Volunteer (we will need to ensure that the current search engine is being transferred to the new page)Saltire Awards (age appropriate)

One you have found the volunteering opportunity you are interested in, just follow the on-screen instruction to register your interest. A notification email will then be sent to the designated contact for the opportunity.

Saltire Awards

For young volunteers aged between 12 and 25, don’t miss out on the Saltire Awards! You can register an account on their webpage. The Saltire Awards are the Scottish Government’s way of celebrating, recognising and rewarding the commitment, contribution and achievements of young volunteers in Scotland, aged between 12 and 25.

Young people gain nationally recognised certificates, signed by Scottish Government Ministers, for the different amounts of volunteering they do.We are here to help 😊 ! If you would like to have a chat about volunteering or help to find volunteer opportunities suitable for you, Please contact us on info@thirdsectorpk.org.uk

Useful information about the benefit of volunteering and what to expect of being a volunteer https://www.volunteerscotland.net/for-volunteer

Disclosure checks – https://www.volunteerscotland.net/for-volunteers/disclosure-checks/

Volunteering Support For OrganisationsAdvertising your volunteer opportunityRegister with us – (embed the Organisation Form and Volunteering Opportunity Form on our webpage and direct the completed form to be sent to our email address)More information can be found on the page Volunteer/What we can do to help? (insert a link to that page)

Q

How do I update or remove my organisations opportunities?

All registered opportunities will be live on webpages for 6 months before it expires. You can remove any no longer needed opportunity at any time prior to the expiry date. You can also extend the publication period by another 6 months before the opportunity expires. Contact us on info@thirdsectorpk.org.uk if you need to make any changes.

Volunteer Management Network

Volunteering for All: national framework- https://www.gov.scot/publications/volunteering-national-framework/

Guidance e.g. policy and procedure, templates and helpful suggestions on ‘thinking about’, ‘getting started’, ‘making a difference’ and ‘building on success’- https://www.volunteerscotland.net/for-organisations/guidance/

Volunteer Wiki- https://volunteerwiki.org.uk/wiki/Welcome_to_VolunteerWiki!

Disclosure Services- https://www.volunteerscotland.net/for-organisations/disclosure-services/

Free Online Training CoursesInvolving VolunteersIntroducing Leadership in Voluntary OrganisationsCollaborative Leadership in Voluntary Organisations

Other available training opportunities (maybe to create a list incorporating links to organisations who provide relevant training around volunteering and employment? Example of organisations could be Skills Development Scotland, PKC Employment Team, PK College, Open University, Volunteer Scotland etc.)

Getting young people involved – Saltire Award for Organisations – https://saltireawards.scot/info-for-organisations

Volunteer Friendly Award – http://www.volunteerfriendly.org.uk/

Q

Do I have to be disabled to use the Shopmobility scheme?

No. Anybody with any mobility difficulty whether temporary or permanent can use the scheme.

Q

Who can use the Shopmobility service?

It is open to anyone who is experiencing short or long-term mobility difficulties. You must be over 16 years old to use a mobility scooter, however we do have smaller manual wheelchairs available.

Q

Do I need to be a Blue Badge holder to use Shopmobility?

No, you do not require a blue badge to use our service.

Q

Do I need to register as a member to use the Shopmobility service?

Yes, you do need to register as a member to use us.

Q

How do I join the Shopmobility scheme?

You will need to complete a simple registration form and supply two forms of identification. One of which must include your name and address (this could be a driving licence, utility bill, bank statement, etc.). The other must have your name and photograph on it (this could include a driving licence, bus pass, passport, blue badge, etc.).

A member of staff will then help you choose the most suitable vehicle and training will be provided. We will also need to be assessed to ensure you can use the equipment appropriately. Please allow 15 minutes for registration and for us to show you how to use the equipment.

Q

How do I collect my scooter or wheelchair?

All equipment must be collected and returned to our premises, except by prior arrangement. Perth Shopmobility is located on the 2nd level of Canal Street Multi Storey Car Park, PH2 8LQ.

Q

When is shopmobility open?

Monday to Friday 9am to 4.30pm (all equipment must be returned no later than 4pm)

Q

How much does Shopmobility cost?

Membership costs a one off fee of £1. There is no charge for daily hire of our equipment – however, as a charity, we rely on your support and donations to help keep our service running. Overnight and short-term hire of our equipment may be permitted on request (charges apply).

NOTE: we can only accept cash or cheque.

Q

Do I have to pre-book Shopmobility?

Yes, a quick phone call to us ensures that suitable equipment is available.

Q

Is there any limit to how long I can borrow the Shopmobility equipment?

Wheelchairs and scooters loaned on short term (daily use) loan must be returned by 4pm. Overnight and short-term hire of our equipment may be permitted on request (charges apply).

NOTE: we can only accept cash or cheque.

Q

I’m a visitor to Perth, can I hire your equipment?

Yes. Anyone with limited mobility can hire our equipment once they become a member and can operate it safely.

Q

Can I hire a mobility scooter overnight? Can I hire for a week?

Yes. Please contact us for more information about overnight and weekly hire. (charges apply)

Please note you must be a registered member for short term equipment hire.

Q

Where can I use the Shopmobility equipment?

If you are using a scooter or wheelchair on short term (daily use) loan, then you can use it anywhere within Perth Town centre

Q

Can I take a scooter out with Perth Town Centre e.g. to a hospital appointment?

If you wanted to take the equipment out with the town centre, remember it is your responsibility to return the equipment. In the event of a puncture or any other breakdown this may require you to hire an accessible taxi at your own cost.

Q

Can you collect/deliver my scooter or wheelchair?

We may be able to collect or deliver your equipment to local hotels within Perth City Centre. It will depend on the location and dates so please get in contact with us to discuss your needs.

Q

What scooters and wheelchairs do you have?

We have small, medium and large mobility scooters for hire, as well as powered wheelchairs and manual wheelchairs. We can also provide stick holders and bags.

NOTE: We do not have sports wheelchairs or two-seater scooters

Q

Where do I park the scooter when I’m out and about?

You may park the scooter safely outside the places you want to visit – shops or restaurant/cafe etc. taking care not to obstruct others. You must also take the key with you.

Q

Once I join Perth Shopmobility, can I use other schemes?

All other Shopmobility schemes are run independently from each other, so membership of this scheme does not entitle you to use other schemes, although you may join other schemes as well if you wish.

Q

Are the scooters easy to drive?

Our scooters and electric wheelchairs are relatively simple to operate. You will be given full instructions on how to use them before you leave the premises.

Q

Can a child sit on my lap whilst using a scooter?

No, we are not insured for this, and we must adhere to our Health & Safety policy.

Q

Can I carry shopping on a scooter?

There is a basket at the front of all our mobility scooters, and most of them are also supplied with a bag situated at the back (shopping bags should not be hung from handlebars).

Q

What speed limits apply to the scooters?

The maximum speed limit is 4mph. We have speed limiters on all our equipment to ensure users can keep to this limit.

Q

Do you sell equipment at Shopmobility?

We only hire equipment, however we occasionally have donated equipment for sale, so it is always worth asking if we have anything suitable for your needs.

Q

Can I drive my scooter on the road?

No, our vehicles cannot legally be used on the public highway (except for the purpose of crossing at suitable points).

Q

Are the scooters and wheelchairs clean and safe?

Your scooter or wheelchair and any additional equipment, including keys, has been thoroughly cleaned and sanitised.

Q

Is Perth easy to get around on a scooter or wheelchair?

Yes. The city centre is compact with lots to see and do.

Q

Can I speak to a member of staff or volunteer at Shopmobility?

Yes. You can phone us on 01738 783960.

Q

What is Shopmobility?

Shopmobility is a scheme that enables people with temporary or permanent mobility difficulties to get around Perth City Centre and shop independently. Members of the scheme can hire equipment that allows them to access the shops and facilities that Perth offers. The City Centre provides good access for wheelchair users and those with walking difficulties, with numerous dropped kerbs, regular crossing points, and widened pavements.

Equipment for short-term loans for holidays or trips is also available for hire (charges apply).

Perth Shopmobility can provide equipment including:

Electric scooters (three and four-wheel)

Powerchairs

Manual wheelchairs (in various sizes)

PKAVS has a valued team of over 80 staff and 100 volunteers whose skills and expertise enable us to reach our objectives and have the positive impact that we do.

More Info

PKAVS relies on over 100 dedicated volunteers who help with all aspects of our work.

More Info
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